Hand Engraving
Tools for Engravers, Jewelers & Metal Artists


AirGraverŽ Patent & Trademark Information

Warranty & Voiding

CATALOG INDEX - CLICK HERE

Lindsay AirGravers & PalmControls
Graver Sharpening
Graver Blanks
Engraving Vises
Engraving Accessories

Engraving Sets
Manual Operated Engraving Tools
Air Compressors

Microscopes
Books
On-line Resources

Coin Carving

Home Page

About:
   Hand Engraving
   Lindsay Airgravers
   Evolution of AirGraver
   Lindsay Graver Point
   Artisan AirGraverŽ
   Classic AirGraverŽ
   PalmControlŽ
 


Feedback:
   Testimonials
   Phil Coggan
   Roland Baptiste
   Andy Shinosky
   Adone Pozzobon
   Delivery & Service
 

News
Gallery
Videos
EngravingForum.com

Contact - Email

Engraving Resources
EngravingForum.com
   Free online engraving   
       books and videos

   EngravingClasses.com
   EngravingGlossary.com
   EngravingSchool.com

 

Introduction to Hand Engraving 

Hand Engraving can be described as the process in which a hardened, shaped, and sharpened piece of steel, called a 'Graver', is pushed through the metal's surface. This is done with one of three methods: by hand pressure (push graver), with a small lightweight hammer and chisel (graver), or with a pneumatic air-driven hammer. Pneumatic AirGravers emulate both the hammer and chisel and the push-graver technique. The graver is ground to a pointed shape adhering to very specific angles. These angles allow the graver to properly enter the metal surface and  travel forward, continuously curling the metal directly in front of the graver face, while leaving behind a small furrow.

The shape of the graver and the angle at which it is held will ultimately decide the furrow shape. The angle can and will often be continuously altered during the process, allowing for the furrow to contain thick and thin graduations of the cut line. If a square-shaped graver is used so that one if its corners enters the metal, it will produce a "V"-shaped furrow. Many graver shapes are available, each leading to a particular style of engraving, and each producing a different result. Usually, the two favored shapes are the "V" and the flat gravers. Personal preference plays a significant role in choosing the tool used.

When using the hammer and chisel method, both hands are required; one to hold the graver, and the other to deliver light hammer impacts against the graver, driving it forward through the material being cut.

With the push graver method, the graver is generally fitted to a small wooden handle held in the palm. The graver remains stationary, and the item being engraved is held firmly and fed into the graver's tip, or rotated into it when a circular or curved line is desired. When making a straight line, the graver is pushed forward using only hand pressure. Each of these methods requires a rotating vise, or a similar holding device, to hold the item being engraved.

The pneumatic graver uses air to drive a small self-contained piston within a graver hand piece. This piston impacts against the engraving tool in the same fashion as in the previously described hammer and chisel method. As with the Push Graver method, one hand is free to hold and rotate the item being engraved.

 

---Continue to "the Art of Engraving"--->

 

Translate Site to Language
Arabic Japanese
Chinese Korean
French Portuguese
German Russian
Italian Spanish

Sister Sites:
www.EngravingForum.com
www.EngravingLessons.com
www.EngravingSchool.com

www.HandEngravingClasses.com
www.EngravingGlossary.com
www.LindsayEngraving.com
Contact - Email